The Gigantic Molten Sulfur Eruption Cmonig to OSAKA!
At Osaka Museum of Natural History
April 11-May31, 2020
Bet. 9:30-16:30

Osaka Museum of Natural History
http://www.mus-nh.city.osaka.jp/language/en/

Access
http://www.mus-nh.city.osaka.jp/language/en/access/

Hello. My name is Mutsunori Yamamoto. I am a science writer and an external researcher at Osaka Museum of Natural History. I would like to give you an announce of one of my most interesting and splendid exhibition “The Most Singular Volcano in the World Exhibition” at Osaka Museum of Natural History held between April 11 and May 31.

A gigantic amount of reddish brown liquid sulfur, or molten sulfur, was expelled at the crater on the mountain flank and flowed into a creek with thunder-like sounds at the Shiretokoiozan Volcano located in the middle part of the Shiretoko Peninsula in 1936. The creek was completely buried with solid yellow sulfur. Many people were surprised while observing the phenomena during the eruption.

I got interested in this special volcano and have researched since my first visit in August 2005. I implemented geological survey, hot spring analysis, volcanic ejecta (sulfur ejecta) survey, Self-potential survey, DC resistivity survey and so on and elucidated the mechanism of the molten sulfur eruption.

When you hear the word “volcano” what would you imagine? 1500 ℃ extremely hot red lava flows or pyroclastic flows? Or phreatic explosions? At the moment you visit and watch this exhibition your imagination of “volcano” would be completely destroyed! This volcano has a “sulfur factory” beside the sulfur eruption crater. This volcano had not been famous. However, this volcano is very special.

I have held this exhibition at Utoro Hokkaido Japan, the nearest town to this volcano, and Rausu last year and so many people enjoyed the exhibition and they were astonished! I am so glad to have a chance to produce one in Osaka. I created two more dioramas so that you may realize how this molten sulfur eruption was. We also borrowed some specimens from Tokyo University which were collected during the last eruption.

I am looking forward to seeing you at the exhibition!

Mutsunori Yamamoto




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Crater I where molten sulfur expelled

Tear-drop sulfur grains created by molten sulfur blown up by explosion at Crater I

Reappearance of 1936-molten sulfur eruption by diorama.

The Most Singular Volcano in the World Exhibition